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. protesters are holding duelling rallies for and against president mohamed morsi, so let's get straight to cnn's reza sayah in cairo for us. he's joining us now by phone. reza, the muslim brotherhood has called for not one but 2 million man marches in support of morsi. what do you know about those? >> reporter: randi, we are at one of them, and this is a very large gathering. obviously for more than a week now we've seen hundreds of thousands of egyptian protests against president morsi and the muslim brotherhood and now supporters of morsi say it's our turn. tens of thousands have showed up outside of cairo university where we are and saying we support president morsi and like the anti-government protest we can put on a large demonstration, too. a large turnout. a few thousand women. the gathering overwhelmingly men, and it's energized, chanting slogans. again, some of the opposition leaders and in support of the president. really this turnout puts into focus the conflict here between the opposition factions, the liberals, the moderates, the secularists and the president's supporters, the isl
's mohammed j j jamjoon. >> reporter: it's horrific details that have emerged the past few hours since we first reported this bombing. activists tell us that around 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. local in syria today that this warplane dropped this shell on this bakery. they say that hundreds of people were lined up outside, that there had been shortages of food throughout the last week. this was the first day that that bakery that had been hit was open and that because of that, at least 100 people they say were killed. the video that we've seen posted online, we can't independently verify it, but it seems to be corroborated by what we've been told by activists. it shows an absolutely grisly scene, mangled bodies in the wreckage of the building and the rubble. you see rebel free syrian army soldiers and civilians trying to tend to the wounded, taking them to the hospital and pulling dead bodies out. men screaming into the camera angry at the regime who they blame for this and asking the world, where are you, why aren't you helping the syrian people. don? >> any explanation, mohammed, from the syrian g
. but the cuts will cut deeply. detric mohammed. >> naacp opportunity, diversity report card. i think the importance of this is to look at the private sector and how it's been implemented. one the greatest challenges to the economy is racial equality. you can't have a middle class when -- so i hope we're going to be doing serious advocacy on this. >> this looks at the hotel and resort industry. >> we'll put that on our facebook page, blog and tumbler. i want to thank my guests this morning. maya wily from the center for social inclusion and deaderick mohammed from the naacp. thank you for joining us. we'll be back next week on saturday and sunday. author dan savage will have a hard look at bringing your energy production into the 21st century. >>> on today's mhp, tuesday marks the day when those start to make the case. is it a new day for the republicans or is it all about doubling down on failed and rejected policies of the past? that and a lot more on melissa harris-perry. we'll see you next week here on "up." two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has pai
killed as they lined up at a bakery to get the bread. mohammed jamjoon joins us by phone from beruit. some of the video you are about to see is extremely graphic. what can you tell us? >> dana, it's horrific and grizzly details that are emerging. opposition activist says hundreds were lined up to get bread from the bakery. the first time it opened in over a week in the town of haifa. it was shelled by a warplane overhead and at least 1200 people killed in the attack. the amateur video posted online shows an extremely gruesome scene. mangled corpses in the rubble. you can see rebel army officers and civilians trying to help the wounded. a terrible, terrible tragedy according to whom we've been speaking with. that town harbors a lot of anti government sentiment. liberated by rebels just a week ago. and because of that, they were targeted by the regime yesterday. they issues a statement and blame what happened to terrorists, and that's the term they use when talking about rebel fighters. the townspeople called for help. called for intervention from the syrian regime. and they sent in mi
of the president, mohamed morsi. frustrated coptic christians and liberals walked out before the votes because they said their views weren't being heard. the fate of the constitution won't be clear for another two weeks when egyptians get to vote on the draft. >>> the moritanian president is warning tension in mali could backfire. locals could align with rebels. one group they are concerned about is al qaeda in the islamic magreb. that's the group the international community has been trying to oust in that region. mark schroeder tells us that aqim is actually consolidating and getting stronger in the region. without international military intervention, mali's military won't be able to push them out. he told me he doesn't even have enough guns for his soldiers. >>> it's been 484 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. what are we doing get it back? incomes and consumer spending fell in october. experts we spoke to said sandy had a significant impact on the numbers. >>> and new problems for susan rice. this is different than what you think i'm about to say. after weeks of criticism from
of homs. mohammed jamjoom joins me from beirut and lakhdar brahimi met with syria's president. before we get to that meeting, let's talk about the bakery bombings, the opposition is saying essentially once a town is, quote, liberated and taken over by rebels, the government's dropping bombs on lines of civilians waiting for bread on purpose in order to terrorize themohammed. >> reporter: that's right. the syrian government is saying that as of yet what happened was the work of terrorists it was terrorists that went there, that carried out the massacre and the syrian military went in there and killed and captured many of them and restored order. that's different than what we're hearing from the eyewitnesses and residents there who say they were targeted on purpose. we must remember we're hearing more and more the last few months about bakeries being targeted. human rights watch in august said that at least ten occasions in aleppo province that bakeries were targeted that scores of people were killed and injured as a result. a lot of the activists we speak with say that more and more these
.com today. >> reporter: that require square, that's where opponents of egyptian president mohamed morsi are demonstrating. there was a shooting here earlier today. the focus, however, tonight is a few miles from where we are right now. the presidential palace. anti-morsi protesters are there in very big numbers trying to knock down the barrier defending that palace, all the while supporters of morsi and the members of the muslim brotherhood already nearby, they were involved in deadly clashes last week. so far they have been separate. a different time perhaps. since then, the military has been trying to grant morsi wide powers to intervene, arrest and get involved to try to calm things down. a lot of attention, as you noted, being paid tonight to the planned referendum on saturday on a draft constitution for egypt. critics say morsi's just trying to push it through, that it is islamist, that it is discriminatory and that he is acting in the last couple of weeks like some strongmen of the past here in egypt. for his part, morsi and his supporters say, hey, they've been elected democratic
egyptian president mohamed morsi signed the new constitution into law. egypt's electoral commission announced voters approved the nation's new constitution which was drafted by morsi's muslim brotherhood allies by a margin of 64%, that happened yesterday. cairo was gripped by violent protests that turned deadly before the vote with critics fearing an era of islamic rule and fewer personal freedoms. >> china launched this, the longest bullet train line in the world, the first one that left beijing this morning zipping down to guangzhou, about the distance from new york to key west. the trip will take eight hours. >> it would be nice to have that here. >>> american soldiers targeted in a bomb attack overseas. we'll go live to the pentagon after this. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eat
. mohammed, give us a sense. this is a pretty big fish for somebody to be leaving,nd i imagine he has valuable information as well being somebody part of the military police. >> reporter: that's right, suzanne. he identifies himself as a major general, that he's the chief of military police in syria. we spoke earlier with rebel free syrian army spokespeople. they said this was the man he claimed to be. the free syrian army helped to shuttle him to safety. it was a very difficult journey getting him from inside syria into neighboring turkey. it took far longer than they thought it would, and they were willing to help. other military officials wanted to defect for a certain amount of time longer. yes, as you said, if this turns out to be true and this man is as high-ranking as he said he is, this is a big blow to the regime. there's more and more high level defections the last several months. the fact more and more are coming seems to suggest he's losing more of a grip of power in syria. this is he not what they want out there when you have the u.n. and arab league enjoy trying to negot
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10